Day: July 2, 2009

By Vernon C. Mitchell, Jr.

In the coming weeks, months, and years, there will be much speculation into just who Michael Jackson was. Already, media outlets scramble for any iota of information they can to report on his death and the subsequent legal battles over his children and estate. In this moment however, more attention should be focused on the music he gave us and particularly in how “the man in the mirror” was not just a reflection of inner revelation, but of the duality of black life in America.

More after the jump.

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Found this intersting tidbit on the ol’ HuffPo this morning — Unemployment is gonna hit a 26-year-high! Break out the balloons, Top Ramen and Boones Farm! The Great Brokacalypse of 2009 staggers on!

From Huffington Post:

WASHINGTON — Out-of-work with no place to land, the legions of America’s unemployed are growing. The Labor Department is scheduled to release a report Thursday expected to show the nation’s unemployment rate edging closer to double digits. Wall Street economists predict the jobless rate will rise to 9.6 percent in June from 9.4 percent in May. That would mark a 26-year high.

The rising rate comes as recession-weary companies continue to cut workers. Economists expect a loss of 363,000 jobs in June, up from 345,000 job cuts in May. Economists believe a chunk of those cuts will be tied to shutdowns at General Motors Corp. and fallout from the troubled auto industry.

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Robin GivhanIn a recent column for the Washington Post’s Media Notes, Howard Kurtz describes the many black female reporters who cover the First Lady and wonders how their ethnicity affects their coverage. He specifically talks about Rachel Swarns of the New York Times, the Post’s Robin Givhan, Newsweek’s Allison Samuels, Darlene Superville of the Associated Press and Politico’s Nia-Malika Henderson.

While Kurtz tries to cover his back end by stating that “no one raises questions when an Irish American male reporter covers a pol named Murphy,” it still doesn’t stop him from delving into the racial side of these black reporters’ works.

More after the jump.

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